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PUBH 5500: Research Sources: Article Databases

Databases useful to locate research articles and other information available from the Merrill-Cazier Library and world wide web [PUBH|5500]

Databases for Journal Articles & Other publications

Reading the Scientific Literature

Reading a scientific paper isn't like reading a book.  Hint:  Don't try to read it straight through from beginning to end!

Here are some tips to help you become skilled:

How to Read a Scientific Paper - Infographic from Elsevier

How to Read a Scientific Article by Mary Purugganan, Ph.D. and Jan Hewitt, Ph.D., Cain Project in Engineering and Professional Communication at Rice University

How to Read a Scientific Paper - Minimally modified from John W. Little and Roy Parker at the University of Arizona (which is no longer retrievable).  This version is from a Biology course from by taught by Professor Devoto Fall 2011 at Wesleyan University.

How to read and understand a scientific paper: a guide for non-scientists

Know the Difference Between Scholarly and Popular Journals/Magazines

Peer reviewed articles are found in scholarly journals.  The checklist below can help you determine if what you are looking at is peer reviewed or scholarly.

  • Both kinds of journals and magazines can be useful sources of information.
  • Popular magazines and newspapers are good for overviews, recent news, first-person accounts, and opinions about a topic.
  • Scholarly journals, often called scientific or peer-reviewed journals, are good sources of actual studies or research conducted about a particular topic. They go through a process of review by experts, so the information is usually highly reliable.

 

Scholarly Journals Popular Sources
Author is an expert on the specific topic of the article Author is usually a journalists who might or might not have particular expertise in the topic
Articles are "peer-reviewed" or evaluated by experts in the field Reviewed by an editor and fact checker.
A list of references or citations appears at the end of the article References usually aren't formally cited
Goal is to present results of research Goal may be to inform, entertain, or persuade
Examples: Journal of the American Medical Association; Journal of American History Examples: Newsweek; Time Magazine

Off Campus Access

You can access library article collections and databases, e-journals and most electronic books by entering your A number and password when prompted.

Class Examples

This file contains the examples and sites we visited in class.

Peer Review in Three Minutes